Books: 5

Haskell

CoverTitleYear
Safety-Driven Web Development
This fast-moving guide introduces web application development with Haskell and Yesod, a potent language/framework combination that supports high-performing applications that are modular, type-safe, and concise. Fully updated for Yesod 1.4, this second edition shows you how Yesod handles widgets, forms, more » persistence, and RESTful content. Author Michael Snoyman also introduces various Haskell tools to supplement your basic knowledge of the language. By the time you finish this book, you'll create a production-quality web application with Yesod's ready-to-use scaffolding. You'll also examine several real-world examples, including a blog, a wiki, a JSON web service, and a Sphinx search server. « less
2015
A Project-Based Approach
Beginning Haskell provides a broad-based introduction to the Haskell language, its libraries and environment, and to the functional programming paradigm that is fast growing in importance in the software industry. The book takes a project-based approach to learning the language that is unified around more » the building of a web-based storefront. Excellent coverage is given to the Haskell ecosystem and supporting tools. These include the Cabal build tool for managing projects and modules, the HUnit and QuickCheck tools for software testing, the Scotty framework for developing web applications, Persistent and Esqueleto for database access, and also parallel and distributed programming libraries. « less
2014
Techniques for Multicore and Multithreaded Programming
If you have a working knowledge of Haskell, this hands-on book shows you how to use the language's many APIs and frameworks for writing both parallel and concurrent programs. You'll learn how parallelism exploits multicore processors to speed up computation-heavy programs, and how concurrency enables more » you to write programs with threads for multiple interactions. Author Simon Marlow walks you through the process with lots of code examples that you can run, experiment with, and extend. « less
2013
A Beginner's Guide
It's all in the name: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! is a hilarious, illustrated guide to this complex functional language. Packed with the author's original artwork, pop culture references, and most importantly, useful example code, this book teaches functional fundamentals in a way you never thought more » possible. You'll start with the kid stuff: basic syntax, recursion, types and type classes. Then once you've got the basics down, the real black belt master-class begins: you'll learn to use applicative functors, monads, zippers, and all the other mythical Haskell constructs you've only read about in storybooks. As you work your way through the author's imaginative (and occasionally insane) examples, you'll learn to: * Laugh in the face of side effects as you wield purely functional programming techniques * Use the magic of Haskell's "laziness" to play with infinite sets of data * Organize your programs by creating your own types, type classes, and modules * Use Haskell's elegant input/output system to share the genius of your programs with the outside world Short of eating the author's brain, you will not find a better way to learn this powerful language than reading Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! Excerpt from the Introduction Haskell is fun, and that’s what it’s all about! This book is aimed at people who have experience programming in imperative languages—such as C++, Java, and Python—and now want to try out Haskell. But even if you don’t have any significant programming experience, I’ll bet a smart person like you will be able to follow along and learn Haskell. My first reaction to Haskell was that the language was just too weird. But after getting over that initial hurdle, it was smooth sailing. Even if Haskell seems strange to you at first, don’t give up. Learning Haskell is almost like learning to program for the first time all over again. It’s fun, and it forces you to think differently. NOTE If you ever get really stuck, the IRC channel #haskell on the freenode network is a great place to ask questions. The people there tend to be nice, patient, and understanding. They’re a great resource for Haskell newbies. So, What's Haskell? [https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/books/oreilly/fx152x149.jpg] Haskell is a purely functional programming language. In imperative programming languages, you give the computer a sequence of tasks, which it then executes. While executing them, the computer can change state. For instance, you can set the variable a to 5 and then do some stuff that might change the value of a. There are also flow-control structures for executing instructions several times, such as for and while loops. Purely functional programming is different. You don’t tell the computer what to do—you tell it what stuff is. For instance, you can tell the computer that the factorial of a number is the product of every integer from 1 to that number or that the sum of a list of numbers is the first number plus the sum of the remaining numbers. You can express both of these operations as functions. > Read the Introduction [https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/books/oreilly/Haskell_Excerpt.pdf] (PDF) in its entirety. « less
2011
This easy-to-use, fast-moving tutorial introduces you to functional programming with Haskell. You'll learn how to use Haskell in a variety of practical ways, from short scripts to large and demanding applications. Real World Haskell takes you through the basics of functional programming at a brisk pace, more » and then helps you increase your understanding of Haskell in real-world issues like I/O, performance, dealing with data, concurrency, and more as you move through each chapter. With this book, you will: * Understand the differences between procedural and functional programming * Learn the features of Haskell, and how to use it to develop useful programs * Interact with filesystems, databases, and network services * Write solid code with automated tests, code coverage, and error handling * Harness the power of multicore systems via concurrent and parallel programming You'll find plenty of hands-on exercises, along with examples of real Haskell programs that you can modify, compile, and run. Whether or not you've used a functional language before, if you want to understand why Haskell is coming into its own as a practical language in so many major organizations, Real World Haskell is the best place to start. « less
2008